A tale of two rings

An early post today, on a Saturday midday. Several important things that I need to mention (important to me anyway).

I forgot to mention yesterday that Lucy had been on a trip to IKEA with Margaret (Ju’s mum and Lucy’s granny).

Booty for university

Booty for university

Juliet loved that place, pretty much on the same scale as I loathed it (follow the yellow brick road inside until you get to the checkouts where you wait ages before being relieved of large amounts of money for clocks and brightly-coloured crockery. The meatballs were small consolation). So the compromise was that J and her mum would occasionally go there together, J braving the road to Milton Keynes. Lucy & I recently suggested to M that she go there with Lucy, for the latter to start buying up student essentials such as ironing board covers and saucepans. As expected, they did indeed have a lovely time and came back with a small mountain of stuff, having hit the nearby Asda store as well. Juliet would so have loved to have done that with Lucy, but this thought is tempered with the similar pleasure that Margaret will have got from it.

Just out of sight of the above photo is the green bag containing the urn of Juliet’s ashes. I’m not showing them because as discussed yesterday, they are not her.

The other important thing to mention is a follow-up to the Small Ring story at the end of  Jane’s visit. I had an e-mail from Sueby this morning, extract here:

If the ring that was mentioned in the blog is a silver twisted one, let me fill you in on some background to it. I told you in that epic letter how much I hated needlework with the dreaded Mrs B. who made my life a misery. Well it got to a point one day that myself and Debbie C.  went to see the headmaster to tell him we didn’t want to do needlework anymore and could we do woodwork with the boys. Well he just about exploded and bawled us out of his office and told us to come back in when we could be less rude! With knees a-trembling and just about ready to throw up and throw in the towel, Debs and I were outside his door egging each other on and tossing for who would knock on the door and who would go in first. We then rephrased our initial request everso slightly with a few pleases and thankyous and we had a calm discussion about how unhappy we both were.
Anyway the upshot to all this was that for the first time in Bayswater school’s history the girls were allowed to do woodwork and metalwork. In woodwork we made some salad servers and a hotplate stand and in metalwork we made the silver rings, having made a prototype in copper first.”

So I went to Juliet’s current jewellery box on her dressing-table, opened the lid and a single ring sitting there was in fact the silver twisted ring that Sueby refers to and the one I remembered. And the one that Jane found in her childhood jewellery box was the prototype copper ring that Sueby also refers to. Thank you ladies, you have no idea how happy this discovery has made me.

JULIET MEC HEHT GEWYRCAN

JULIET MEC HEHT GEWYRCAN

If any readers don’t understand the caption, then try googling for “Alfred’s jewel”. And if you don’t really get this story, then you probably don’t really get this blog.

About hodders

Husband and proud father of two daughters. Now a widower. Trying to balance between not dwelling on Juliet's death, but telling the world how much I loved her. Tricky.
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4 Responses to A tale of two rings

  1. Richard says:

    I had a great time going round ASDA and IKEA with Lucy. I had the fish and chips which was suprisingly tasty. Richard (Lucy’s Granddad)

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  2. Debbie C says:

    I am the Debbie C that, along with Sue, barged into the headmasters office to complain about the dreaded Mrs Blunt our sewing teacher – yes that really was her name! I remember it exactly as Sue described – terrifying but what a result! I wish I could say that my woodwork was better than my needlework – but it wasn’t! Juliet and Jane (of Germany fame) were Mrs Blunt’s favourites as they were both so good at needlework which Sue and I didn’t mind one bit – we just spent all our lessons unpicking everything we did and getting told off constantly for talking too much!

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