Probate, and faith restored

In between funeral admin today I’ve been ploughing away at a piece of work, to be delivered to the ultimate audience next week i.e. my peers and colleagues. Wish I could get enthused about it, it would make it so much easier. It’s a paper on the value of enterprise systems management, calculating the return on investment case and differentiating it from the relatively new discipline of service management. Never mind…

A brief trip to Oxford, to the County Court, for my Probate interview. This is basically a signing and declaration that I am who I purport to be, and that I am the sole chappie charged with distributing Juliet’s estate. The fact that I could have done so literally at the click of a mouse before her death is irrelevant. Anyway, the process was quick – perhaps 2 minutes, lengthened only by another 10 seconds where the clerk had to cross out “swore on the New Testament” and wrote “affirmed my oath” or some such phrase.

Left the court building via the airport-style scanners, and past the groups of people outside, who were all wearing  ill-fitting suits, eating Gregg’s pasties and enormous slabs of confectionery. (Look, they might have been lawyers on their lunch break. They might be wrongly-accused victims of justice. But I think they were just Oxford low-life in trouble again).

Lucy took her driving test for the second time – and failed a second time. She wandered into the wrong lane while negotiating a roundabout. The new plan is now to book a test in Banbury for the end of the year and perhaps get a few lessons in York.

Back home I had an unexpected and very touching late sympathy card – signed by all the teachers at Juliet’s former “proper” school, The Grange in Banbury, which she left in 2008. Also enclosed was a letter from the new head teacher (whom neither J or I have met) suggesting that a plaque be placed next to the murals she painted many years ago. Well, you know me by now readers. Instant tears. What a lovely idea. And in searching for the photos of the murals – found them, September 2003 – I was absolutely delighted to find that rare item: photos of Juliet teaching, on the 24th June 2004.

Juliet taking the morning register

Juliet taking the morning register

Confession: I always had a “thing” about female teachers, and I was lucky enough to marry one. I really like that photo, she’s so in control. Here’s the afternoon photo, when it was presumably a bit warmer, although the children’s weather chart in another photo says windy and cloudy. In a moment of political correctness, I’ve blanked out some of the children’s faces (they were pretty ugly, mind. Joke).

Juliet reads "The Enormous Crocodile" by Roald Dahl

Juliet reads "The Enormous Crocodile" by Roald Dahl

Still haven’t had a reply from the newspaper editor (see yesterday’s post) but the letter from the headmaster today restores my faith in human nature. It’s the little things that count. And there’s scope for a punning reference to the schoolchildren there, but I’m off to the pub now.

About hodders

Husband and proud father of two daughters. Now a widower. Trying to balance between not dwelling on Juliet's death, but telling the world how much I loved her. Tricky.
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3 Responses to Probate, and faith restored

  1. rebecca says:

    The idea of having a plaque next to Juliet’s murals is wonderful, a most fitting memorial. As the head sounds a top man, why not ask him to take pictures of them, or for you to take pictures as they are now. Sorry for Lucy, perhaps the passing the driving test first time gene is for the Hodkin males only (I took 4 attempts as you may or may not remember) xxxx

    Like

  2. Pingback: Eight weeks on | Some Distant Shore

  3. Pingback: Even a ginepig can have a plaque | Some Distant Shore

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